How to identify a Bearish Pennant and take advantage of it

Candlestick analysis is one of the most important concepts in price action analysis. The goal of the procedure is to look at how a chart looks and then using this information to predict how the price will move in the future.

We just looked at how the cup and handle pattern, which is an important component of candlestick analysis works. In this report, we will look at the bearish pennant pattern and how you can use it in the market.

What is the Bearish Pennant?

The term bearish pennant is made up of two parts. Bearish refers to when the price of an asset is moving downwards. It is simply the opposite of being bullish. On the other hand, the term pennant refers to a flag or banner that is longer than the hoist.

In trading, when the price of an asset drops sharply, there are usually two things in play: It usually means that sellers are prevailing while buyers are losing.

However, in most times, a bearish trend is usually interrupted by a few periods of bullishness. This happens when buyers start coming in as some sellers start taking profit. As this happens, it tends to form a pattern, which is known as a bearish pennant.

How the pattern is built

There are three main parts of a bearish pennant. First, there is a flag pole. A flag pole is a long, and often straight line, that happens when the price of an asset declines sharply. It is this flag pole that separate the bearish pennant with other patterns.

The second part is the breakout level. This is a level where the price suddenly moves in continuation of a trend.

Finally, there is a pennant itself. This is simply a small triangle pattern. This triangle usually happens when bulls and bears battle about the movement of an asset. As they battle, the price tends to consolidate between several levels.

The chart below shows how a bearish pennant looks like.

How-to-built-a-bearish-pennant

How to Spot a Bearish pennant

A common question is how to spot or identify a bearish pennant pattern. As mentioned above, the process is actually very simple:

  1. You need to first spot the price of an asset drop sharply
  2. See the movements that follow
  3. Connect the upper and lower swings

If it forms a triangle, then you have a bearish pennant pattern.

Please note: It is worth noting that there is another pattern known as bearish flag. This one does not form a triangle. Instead, it happens as an ascending equidistance channel.

Practical Example

A good example of this pattern is shown on the chart below. As you can see, the price of Bitcoin formed a sharp descent as bears took control. As the price declined, bulls started to come in, which led to a small triangle pattern.

This pattern is the bearish pennant and it was followed by a continuation.

Example-of-Bearish-Pennant

What about a bullish pennant?

A bullish pennant is the exact opposite of a bearish pennant. It happens when a sharp increase in price is followed by a similar consolidation as shown above. A good example of this bullish pennant pattern is shown on the EUR/USD pair below.

Example-of-bullish-pennant

Final Thoughts

Bearish and bullish pennants are rare but are very effective when you are trading. They are easy to spot and often very accurate. Also, they don’t require integration with technical indicators like moving averages and RSI.

We recommend that you spend a lot of time practicing and learning about this pattern before you use it.

External Useful Resources

  • Differences between a Symmetrical Triangles and Pennant Patterns – Investopedia
  • Chart Examples of Flag and Pennant Patterns – Chartpatterns

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