What is the Typical Day Like in the Career of a Day Trader?

What is the Typical Day Like in the Career of a Day Trader?

The Excitement of Stock Trading – the Best There is!
Imagine a career where, when you wake up, the only sure thing about your work day is that it will be full of excitement.

As a day trader, you really never know what will happen during the day. You get into the trading floor, say 8:30am EST. The buzz and the energy starts to rise as the traders come in to work. You spend an hour relaxing, reading articles, watching the news, looking at stock quotes and stock charts. You check to if there is anything exciting happening with your handful of “go to” stocks. You look at what stocks are in-play today and see if you might see an opportunity to trade them. And then bang! The opening bell rings at 9:30am EST and you are off into a world of excitement.

The trading day as a day-trader typically lasts six-and-a-half hours. If you ask the typical day trader he or she will probably tell you it feels like it lasts 30 minutes. There is so much information coming at you all day long. The rush of looking at stock quotes coming through your trading platform is intense. You make lightning fast trades all day long based on all the fast flying information that hits your trading screen. Before you know it the day is over. You look down at the profit you made for the day. The feeling is pretty amazing. All of sudden you feel kind of sad, because you realize you have to wait until tomorrow to place another trade and get that rush back. When the day ends you leave the trading floor. You take no work home, unless of course you want to.

There are very few careers like day trading. The ability to make your own trading decisions is a great feeling. Very few work environments are both casual and exciting at the same time. Does your career offer all of this? If your career doesn’t offer all of this you should look for the day trading floor that is closest to you. Most day trading floors allow you to learn to traded without putting up any capital.

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Photo by Lending Memo